Tag Archives: William Wordsworth

£100,000 bequest puts new life into William Wordsworth’s former home at Grasmere (From The Westmorland Gazette)

£100,000 bequest puts new life into William Wordsworth’s former home at Grasmere

By Hannah Upton

NATIONAL Trust workers at a former Lake District home of William Wordsworth were left open-mouthed when a surprise benefactor turned up with a cheque for £100,000.

Allan Bank in Grasmere, which was later home to one of the trust’s founders, Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley, was opened to the public for the first time last year after it was devastated by fire in 2011.

Staff had no idea that when they showed visitor Antony Elliot around the Georgian villa that he would present them with the donation on behalf of his cousin Brenda Donoghue. The former nurse left the bequest to the National Trust in the Lake District when she died last April, aged 83.

After visiting the house, Mr Elliot declared she would have approved of restoration work there as she loved gardens and literature.

He said: “My cousin loved books and beautiful colourful gardens and, though she had no children of her own, she delighted in seeing children play.

“Restoring the house and garden at Allan Bank for future generations is a wonderful and fitting memorial to her and I look forward to seeing her legacy come to life.”

Manager Dave Almond said: “This will allow us to continue some of the vital work needed to restore and conserve Allan Bank.

“This is the first step in a very exciting project that will allow us to recreate the original views and restore the kitchen garden, as well as creating more spaces for books and reading.

“Mrs Donoghue’s gift will ensure that we can continue to bring Allan Bank back to life.”

Visitor services supervisor Elaine Taylor said Mr Elliot, who visited the house with his wife and son, had already pledged to return to Allan Bank in the summer.

She said a lot of the work done at the home, which has mostly bare walls and basic furniture, has been to keep a relaxed, interactive feel where visitors could enjoy a ‘home from home’.

“Children and adults can play freely here, inside and out, they can create paintings of the views from the house, spot red squirrels in the grounds, take part in crafting, or just sit and read quietly.

“When we first opened we asked visitors to suggest what we should do with the house, and they said leave it as it is.”

Wordsworth leased the property, which he previously said marred his views from Dove Cottage, for three years from 1808.

The house is open seven days a week and staff said they were always on the lookout for volunteers to welcome visitors.

via £100,000 bequest puts new life into William Wordsworth’s former home at Grasmere (From The Westmorland Gazette).

Ramlin Around Englands Lake District – WORLD PROPERTY CHANNEL Global News Center

Ramlin Around Englands Lake District

Posted by Steve Winston

The Lake District is the Eternal England.

Its the England of tiny villages that havent changed in a thousand years. Of green mountains and clear-blue waters and emerald meadows dotted with sheep. Of 2,000-year-old Roman ramparts. And of quiet country paths where youre more likely to see fox, fowl, or cow than human beings, save for the warm smiles in the bucolic cottages and villages along the way.

Here, in the northern part of England, near the border of Scotland, even the accent changes, with a bit o the Scottish lilt.

The “human” highlight of the Lake District is Hadrians Wall, a 73-mile-long series of ramparts and forts constructed by the Roman Emperor Hadrian, to keep the marauding Scots at bay. Today its a World Heritage Site. Walk it, and youll come to milecastles small fortresses about a “Roman” mile apart) and Neolithic stone circles.

Lake District National Park’s 880 square-miles include England’s highest mountain (Scafell Pike, 3,068′), its deepest lake (Wastwater), and wonderfully-evocative villages such as Bowness-on-Windermere. And a company called English Lakeland Ramblers (located in Montclair, Virginia), which has been doing walking tours of England, Scotland, and Wales since 1985, can take you there.

Here, you can walk in the footsteps of the early conservationists such as the appropriately-named poet William Wordsworth, John Ruskin (a noted artist and critic in the 1800’s), and Beatrix Potter (author of children’s books such as The Tale of Peter Rabbit). You’ll stay in classic country inns, and explore a new part of the Lake District each day. You’ll visit Dove Cottage, home of William Wordsworth. You’ll take the Windermere ferry to Hilltop Farm, home of Beatrix Potter. You’ll visit Brantwood, home of John Ruskin, and the Neolithic Castlerigg Stone Circle. And you’ll take a launch ride on the beautiful lake called Derwentwater.

You start off in the picturesque village of Grasmere, in which you’ll visit Grasmere Church, with its intricate wooden beams, the Grasmere Gingerbread shop, and the graveyard where William Wordsworth is buried.

On the second day, you’ll walk from your inn to the resort town of Ambleside, via the summit of Loughrigg, a stunning viewpoint. In the afternoon you’ll visit Wordsworth’s home, Dove Cottage, and the Wordsworth Museum.

The next day, you’ll take the ferry across Windermere, and head for Hilltop Farm, purchased by Beatrix Potter in 1905. Following that is a drive to Brantwood, home of poet/artist/social reformer/conservationist John Ruskin, and lunch at the Jumping Jenny restaurant, named after Ruskin’s boat.

On the fourth day, you’ll travel to the Borrowdale Valley, along a mountainous road through passes with names like Wrynose and Hard Knott, with a stop at an ancient Roman fort. You’ll visit the colorful village of Boot, and Eskdale Corn Mill. Later you’ll pass the ancient cross planted by Vikings at Gosforth.

The next day brings you to the Castlerigg Stone Circle, to be followed by an afternoon walk on the Derwentwater lakeshore path, or a harder alternative – crossing the summit of Cat Bells (worth the extra effort, because of the views!). The day ends with a launch ride on Derwentwater.

On the last full day, you’ll visit the mine shop at the top of Honister Pass, with a possible detour to the Iron Age-fortress atop Castle Crag.

Afterwards, when you’re back in the hustle and bustle of the real world, the Lake District may seem a million miles away. But you’ll always be able to summon up the gentle memories of its green hills, its ancient walls, its lost-in-time villages, and its welcoming people.

via Ramlin Around Englands Lake District – WORLD PROPERTY CHANNEL Global News Center.