Tag Archives: Grasmere

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Bassenthwaite Lakeside Lodges for Sale
Bassenthwaite Lodge for Sale
Rowan Cottage, Grasmere for sale
Rowan Cottage in Grasmere for Sale
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The Beeches, Fieldside Grange, Keswick for Sale
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£100,000 bequest puts new life into William Wordsworth’s former home at Grasmere (From The Westmorland Gazette)

£100,000 bequest puts new life into William Wordsworth’s former home at Grasmere

By Hannah Upton

NATIONAL Trust workers at a former Lake District home of William Wordsworth were left open-mouthed when a surprise benefactor turned up with a cheque for £100,000.

Allan Bank in Grasmere, which was later home to one of the trust’s founders, Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley, was opened to the public for the first time last year after it was devastated by fire in 2011.

Staff had no idea that when they showed visitor Antony Elliot around the Georgian villa that he would present them with the donation on behalf of his cousin Brenda Donoghue. The former nurse left the bequest to the National Trust in the Lake District when she died last April, aged 83.

After visiting the house, Mr Elliot declared she would have approved of restoration work there as she loved gardens and literature.

He said: “My cousin loved books and beautiful colourful gardens and, though she had no children of her own, she delighted in seeing children play.

“Restoring the house and garden at Allan Bank for future generations is a wonderful and fitting memorial to her and I look forward to seeing her legacy come to life.”

Manager Dave Almond said: “This will allow us to continue some of the vital work needed to restore and conserve Allan Bank.

“This is the first step in a very exciting project that will allow us to recreate the original views and restore the kitchen garden, as well as creating more spaces for books and reading.

“Mrs Donoghue’s gift will ensure that we can continue to bring Allan Bank back to life.”

Visitor services supervisor Elaine Taylor said Mr Elliot, who visited the house with his wife and son, had already pledged to return to Allan Bank in the summer.

She said a lot of the work done at the home, which has mostly bare walls and basic furniture, has been to keep a relaxed, interactive feel where visitors could enjoy a ‘home from home’.

“Children and adults can play freely here, inside and out, they can create paintings of the views from the house, spot red squirrels in the grounds, take part in crafting, or just sit and read quietly.

“When we first opened we asked visitors to suggest what we should do with the house, and they said leave it as it is.”

Wordsworth leased the property, which he previously said marred his views from Dove Cottage, for three years from 1808.

The house is open seven days a week and staff said they were always on the lookout for volunteers to welcome visitors.

via £100,000 bequest puts new life into William Wordsworth’s former home at Grasmere (From The Westmorland Gazette).

Bull rescued from slurry pit in Lake District farm (From The Westmorland Gazette)

Bull rescued from slurry pit in Lake District farm

11:53am Sunday 31st March 2013 in News

FIREFIGHTERS spent four hours rescuing a young bull from a slurry pit at a Lake District farm yesterday.

Teams from Kendal and Ambleside were called to the Grasmere farm, at around 11am on Saturday, after receiving a report that a bull, weighing around one tonne, had ‘fallen through a hole in the floor’.

A Cumbria Fire spokesman said: “It was a hard lift because of the dangers of slurry pits.

“The hole was only about two metres by one metre wide, but we had to make it bigger to get the bull out.

“Crews had to take the safety of the animal, which was obviously distressed, and themselves into account.”

The roof of the barn had to be removed so crews could lift the bull vertically using strops and the farmer’s tractor. Attempts to winch the animal were unsuccessful.

via Bull rescued from slurry pit in Lake District farm (From The Westmorland Gazette).

Eco friendly breaks in the Lake District, go by train, electric car and bike in England’s biggest National Park – Mirror Online

National park and ride: Low-carbon breaks in the Lakes

Nigel Thompson uses an electric train, car and bike on a green trip to the Lake District

Wordsworth may well have wandered lonely as a cloud. But if the Cumbrian poet had done his misty meanderings around the Lake District in the early 21st century rather than 200 years previously, it might have been a cloud of petrol fumes the daffodil-dabbler encountered.

England’s biggest National Park – some 885 square miles of utter joy – has a problem. Too many cars. In short, it’s a victim of its own success.

The creation of the National Park in 1951 has, of course, inspired millions of visitors over the years, drawn by the timeless beauty of the fells and lakes.

And around 87% of the 16 million tourists a year arrive by car, choking the narrow roads and bringing the risk of pollution from exhaust fumes.

So, in a £6.9million, four-year initiative, the GoLakes tourist board has started a scheme to get the visitors out of their cars, into a low-emission vehicle, or on to public transport and bikes.

Not ordinary bikes, mind… but electric bikes that give the part-time pedal pusher some much-needed help up the hills. So, to join in the eco enterprise, I headed to the Lake District last autumn with the firm intention of steering clear of a car powered by the internal combustion engine.

Charged: Nigel ready for his trip on an electric bike
Charged: Nigel ready for his trip on an electric bike

That journey from my home in Essex began with a walk to the station, an electric train into London, the Tube to Euston station, and an electric train out of London to the Lakes.

And that Virgin Trains Pendolino service to Oxenholme is especially green too, as it is equipped with regenerative braking, which means that every time the driver applies the brakes, electricity is returned to the national grid.

Consequently, Virgin Pendolino trains generate enough electricity each year to charge 4.5 million mobile phones.

On arriving in Oxenholme, there would of course be no using a taxi to get to my accommodation in Windermere. A short train ride – diesel, but still public transport – saw me to the Cumbrian town’s station then a 20-minute walk brought me to the delightful Rum Doodle B&B. The bed part was a lovely four-poster and the breakfast part was good too. It was named and styled after a 1950s spoof mountaineering book, The Ascent of Rum Doodle, which I bought on Amazon and it is indeed very amusing.

As was the witty, wry commentary from the crew on a boat trip around Lake Windermere from neighbouring Bowness-on-Windermere that afternoon.

It was a glorious autumn day and the lake was mirror calm as we chugged past various sights including the unusual, circular house on Belle Isle. It was £7.20 very enjoyably spent.

But the purpose of my trip was to test the GoLakes options, so the next morning I made an early start to catch a bus to Ambleside – where there was time for a quick wander around a very pleasant town – and then another bus on to Grasmere. Here, I headed to the Wordsworth Hotel and Spa, having reserved an electric bike.

Tranquil: Lakeside reflections at Grasmere
Tranquil: Lakeside reflections at Grasmere
Getty

The Giant machine is a sturdy beast and comes with two battery packs so you would probably be good for at least 30 miles. There are three settings – economy, normal or sport – which offer 25%, 50% and 75% power assistance.

So basically on the lowest, most frugal setting you do 75% of the work and the motor chips in with 25%. On the steeper roads of the Lake District – and there are plenty of those! – you really do need the highest setting.

I had reserved an electric Renault Twizy car for £10 an hour at the Langdale Estate Hotel and Spa in Elterwater and the direct route there meant tackling the Red Bank road with its brutal 25% incline.

Even with the battery going with the full 75% assistance it was eventually more than I could manage and I had to get off and push. Still, coasting on the other side of the hill to Elterwater soothed my thighs, as the bikes are heavy and even pushing one up a 25% slope is hard work.

At the Langdale, I met Andy Dawson, the grounds manager who was getting my car ready, and Dan Visser, the marketing boss who is on the GoLakes committee and is one of the driving forces behind the electric car initiative.

The Twizy is a small two-seater – one behind the other – and there’s no glass in the side windows, so you need a coat on a cool day. The range between charges is about 60 miles and, as with the electric bikes, GoLakes has created a network of charging points around the National Park.

In an emergency you could simply stop at someone’s house and ask for a plug. Some people have been known to do that.

So what’s the £6,690 Twizy like to drive? In short, fantastic fun. It is light, manoeuvrable, surprisingly nippy and virtually silent, which is very strange at first. But that silence means that as you are whizzing around the lakes and fells you hear the sound of sheep, birds and sometimes just the sound of silence. It’s wonderful.

I pushed the Twizy hard, tackling a steep, hairpin pass with no problem at all.

On the instrument panel there is an indicator which shows how much you are draining the battery and, conversely, when you are coasting downhill it displays the charge which is then being returned to it. After zipping around for an hour and a half I still had plenty of charge and if time had permitted I’d have whizzed about for another 90 minutes.

But it would soon be getting dark and I did not want to tackle Red Bank at night – a wise decision as the damp hill was tricky to descend even in diminishing daylight as I gingerly inched down.

Back at Grasmere, as I neared the Wordsworth Hotel to return the bike, I notched up a GoLakes electric bike first – a puncture.

Luckily it was only 200 yards from the hotel, as wheeling the bike with a flat tyre was a real effort. Once the staff at the Wordsworth had worked out how to process the flat-tyre paperwork, I headed back to Ambleside on an open-top service bus, which really blew away the cobwebs. At Ambleside there was time for a couple of locally brewed beers before catching my bus back to Windermere, packing my kit ready for the morning train back home and having a pleasant pub meal at the Elleray.

In the spirit of an ecofriendly trip to the Lake District I had a salad… plenty of greens, you see.

via Eco friendly breaks in the Lake District, go by train, electric car and bike in England’s biggest National Park – Mirror Online.

Lake District cottages special offers and Easter Availability

 
Late Availability
Easter Breaks Still Available
 
Planning a family holiday in the Lake District for the Easter break?
Please see the small selection below of CLICK HERE to see the full range available
 
 
 
Rowan Cottage,
Grasmere
    Rowan Cottage, bedroom, self catering in Grasmere     Rowan Cottage, dining kitchen, self catering in Grasmere
Sleeps 6
Friday 5th April for 7 nights
Now only £750
Marine Terrace,
Silloth
Marine Terrace, Lounge, Lakes Cottage Holidays   Marine Terrace , Dining Kitchen, Lakes Cottage Holidays
Sleeps 11
Saturday 30th March for 7 nights
Now Only £790
 
Whitbarrow Holiday Village Troutbeck (5),
Nr Ullswater
 
Whitbarrow Holiday Village, Dining and kitchen area, Lakes Cottage Holidays  Whitbarrow Holiday Village, Lounge, Lakes Cottage Holidays
Sleeps 6
Friday 29th March for 7 nights
Now only £595
 
BOOK NOW AND RECEIVE
£25 OFF
 
Quote LCH01
 
 
Amazing Offers
 
Miller Beck,
Newby Bridge Nr Cartmel
Millerbeck, dining area, Lakes Cottage Holidays   Millerbeck, sitting room, Lakes Cottage Holidays
Sleeps 8
Book this weekend and receive
£200 off a holiday in July and August
Home Farm,
High Hampsfield Nr Cartmel
Home Farm, Lindale, ground floor suite, Lakes Cottage Holidays
Sleeps 9
Book this weekend and receive
£200 off a holiday in July and August
Whitecroft,
Cartmel
Whitecroft, Cartmel, bedroom, Lakes Cottage Holidays   Whitecroft, Cartmel, conservatory, Lakes Cottage Holidays
Sleeps 6
Book this weekend and receive 10% off
Barn Roost,
Ruthwaite Nr Ireby
Barn Roost, Lounge, Lakes Cottage Holidays
Sleeps 4
Now £50 off specific weeks
Greta Mill,
Hot Tub,
Keswick
Greta Mill, Keswick, Lakes Cottage Holidays   Greta Mill, Keswick, Lakes Cottage Holidays
    Sleeps 8/10
Now with £100 or over off specific weeks
 
NEW COTTAGES
 
Low Brow Barn,
Ambleside
    Low Brow Barn, Lounge, Lakes Cottage Holidays   Low Brow Barn, Open Diner, Lakes Cottage Holidays
Sleeps 4
 
The Hyning Estate
Six 5* luxury cottages set in picturesque surroundings
The Hyning Estate, Kendal, Lakes Cottage Holidays   The Hyning Estate, meeting room, Lakes Cottage Holidays
The Old Farmhouse, lounge/dining, Lakes Cottage Holidays   The Bake House, lounge, Lakes Cottage Holidays
 
There are many more new cottages on our website, please CLICK HERE for further details

Ramlin Around Englands Lake District – WORLD PROPERTY CHANNEL Global News Center

Ramlin Around Englands Lake District

Posted by Steve Winston

The Lake District is the Eternal England.

Its the England of tiny villages that havent changed in a thousand years. Of green mountains and clear-blue waters and emerald meadows dotted with sheep. Of 2,000-year-old Roman ramparts. And of quiet country paths where youre more likely to see fox, fowl, or cow than human beings, save for the warm smiles in the bucolic cottages and villages along the way.

Here, in the northern part of England, near the border of Scotland, even the accent changes, with a bit o the Scottish lilt.

The “human” highlight of the Lake District is Hadrians Wall, a 73-mile-long series of ramparts and forts constructed by the Roman Emperor Hadrian, to keep the marauding Scots at bay. Today its a World Heritage Site. Walk it, and youll come to milecastles small fortresses about a “Roman” mile apart) and Neolithic stone circles.

Lake District National Park’s 880 square-miles include England’s highest mountain (Scafell Pike, 3,068′), its deepest lake (Wastwater), and wonderfully-evocative villages such as Bowness-on-Windermere. And a company called English Lakeland Ramblers (located in Montclair, Virginia), which has been doing walking tours of England, Scotland, and Wales since 1985, can take you there.

Here, you can walk in the footsteps of the early conservationists such as the appropriately-named poet William Wordsworth, John Ruskin (a noted artist and critic in the 1800’s), and Beatrix Potter (author of children’s books such as The Tale of Peter Rabbit). You’ll stay in classic country inns, and explore a new part of the Lake District each day. You’ll visit Dove Cottage, home of William Wordsworth. You’ll take the Windermere ferry to Hilltop Farm, home of Beatrix Potter. You’ll visit Brantwood, home of John Ruskin, and the Neolithic Castlerigg Stone Circle. And you’ll take a launch ride on the beautiful lake called Derwentwater.

You start off in the picturesque village of Grasmere, in which you’ll visit Grasmere Church, with its intricate wooden beams, the Grasmere Gingerbread shop, and the graveyard where William Wordsworth is buried.

On the second day, you’ll walk from your inn to the resort town of Ambleside, via the summit of Loughrigg, a stunning viewpoint. In the afternoon you’ll visit Wordsworth’s home, Dove Cottage, and the Wordsworth Museum.

The next day, you’ll take the ferry across Windermere, and head for Hilltop Farm, purchased by Beatrix Potter in 1905. Following that is a drive to Brantwood, home of poet/artist/social reformer/conservationist John Ruskin, and lunch at the Jumping Jenny restaurant, named after Ruskin’s boat.

On the fourth day, you’ll travel to the Borrowdale Valley, along a mountainous road through passes with names like Wrynose and Hard Knott, with a stop at an ancient Roman fort. You’ll visit the colorful village of Boot, and Eskdale Corn Mill. Later you’ll pass the ancient cross planted by Vikings at Gosforth.

The next day brings you to the Castlerigg Stone Circle, to be followed by an afternoon walk on the Derwentwater lakeshore path, or a harder alternative – crossing the summit of Cat Bells (worth the extra effort, because of the views!). The day ends with a launch ride on Derwentwater.

On the last full day, you’ll visit the mine shop at the top of Honister Pass, with a possible detour to the Iron Age-fortress atop Castle Crag.

Afterwards, when you’re back in the hustle and bustle of the real world, the Lake District may seem a million miles away. But you’ll always be able to summon up the gentle memories of its green hills, its ancient walls, its lost-in-time villages, and its welcoming people.

via Ramlin Around Englands Lake District – WORLD PROPERTY CHANNEL Global News Center.